Classification Society related terms, abbreviations and acronyms

Classification Society related terms, abbreviations and acronyms

Acceptance Criteria The set of values or criteria which a design, product, service or process is required to conform with in order to be accepted. AIC Acceptance into Class The process by which unclassed vessels – including vessels which are classed by a non-IACS member or associate – can gain classification from an IACS member. Formal submission of plans and information for design appraisal will usually be required in addition to a full survey. Annual Survey see Periodic Surveys Appraisal…

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Chartering Terms & Abbreviations

Chartering Terms & Abbreviations

Aaosa Always afloat or safe aground. The condition for a vessel whilst in port. Addendum Additional terms at the end of a charter party. Arbitration Method of settling disputes which is usually binding on parties. A clause usually in a charter party. ASBA American Shipbrokers Association B/L Bill of lading, receipt of goods shipped onboard signed by Master (or agent) who contracts to carry them, stating terms on which goods are carried. B/N Booking note Backletter Where a seller/shipper issues…

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Typical Recommended Testing for 1st Foots

Typical Recommended Testing for 1st Foots

The Chart below serves as an indication of the typical tests that may be expected on the 1st Foot Samples based on the previous cargo history. These typical tests are an indication only, and may vary according to Terminal Requirements. This Chart may be downloaded as a pdf document here: Recommended Tests for 1st Foots

Chlorides: Organic vs Inorganic

Chlorides: Organic vs Inorganic

Organic vs Inorganic……..what’s the difference? There are a multitude of publications which refer to ‘Organic’ or ‘Inorganic’ Chlorides, with ‘Organic’ Chlorides being an undesired contamination. But which is which and what products contain which element? The following is an attempt to explain this. Organic Chlorides are an undesired contamination in crude oils. The presence of even a very small amount (a few ppm) of chlorides can be catastrophic during crude oil fractionation in the refineries which can cause considerable damage…

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Wall Wash Test Precautions and Causes of WWT Failures

Wall Wash Test Precautions and Causes of WWT Failures

Wall-Wash Test Precautions and some Causes of Failure Always use disposable plastic gloves when wall washing – the human hand contains more salt than normal requirements and is a common cause of chloride contamination. Wear clean clothes and do not allow working gloves in the tank, avoid all contact of clothing with the tank, wear protective disposable shoe covers. Use a clean bucket on a clean line for transferring test equipment into the tank. Wash the funnel and sample bottles…

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Water White to Water White

Water White to Water White

A simple powerpoint presentation detailing a chemical tanker’s progress from a water-white condition back to a water-white condition. May be used to demonstrate to new officers and crew the progression of a cargo from receiving loading orders to the final return of a tank to a water-white condition. It may also be used for the same reason, but to shore-based personnel.

Water-White Standard

Water-White Standard

Returning a cargo tank back to a water-white standard is, or should be, the default tank cleaning operation following the discharge of any product on a chemical tanker. From that default position and depending on the next product to be loaded, additional cleaning can take place to suit the supplied product specifications. Should the specifications of the next product not have been advised, then cleaning should be carried out to the highest known specification for that particular product. Of course,…

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Molasses

Molasses

Molasses is an easy product to carry and handle, however if problems occur the often create some spectacular results. The items below may then be of help. Enclosures Prior to loading Tanks should be free of traces of any previous cargo, odour free and dry. Open lines and valves check for water. Check and test heating coils and log test results. This is the only accurate means of calculating cargo quantity is by means of a Draft Survey, although the…

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Nitrogen or Air Blowing

Nitrogen or Air Blowing

The dangers of cargo tank overpressurisation by the introduction of nitrogen whilst undertaking the common practices of drying, purging or padding cargo tanks is well known and documented. What is less well addressed is the danger of tank overpressurisation when pigging or line blowing, especially when using air as a propellant. These dangers were first promulgated by IMO in ‘BLG 7/INF.7’ on 19 April 2002, in an ICS submission: ‘Chemical Tankers receiving nitrogen at high flow rates from shore’, where…

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Cargo Resistance Lists

Cargo Resistance Lists

Also known as Cargo Resistance Guides, Product Resistance Lists, these publications are provided by all manufacturers of Cargo Tank Coatings and provide a reference guide to the suitability of any particular tank coating to carry a product or cargo. All Masters and Chief Officers of Chemical Tankers that have undergone the IMO approved Chemical Tanker Training Courses, know the importance of these guides, but as a surprisingly high proportion of cargo/hull claims arising from coating damage is prevalent in the…

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